Saturday, October 10, 2015

In Benares, A Satisfying Day Turned Sad

Today I did some of the things I had been wanting to do in Benares. I had two freshly-made, hot rasagullas (only Rs 10 each); I had not one but three Banarasi paans (the idea was to have only one but I quickly returned for two more); and, above all, covered nearly all its 84 ghats on foot — travelling a distance of about 7 km — from Assi Ghat on the southern extreme to Prahlad Ghat on the northern.
I made the return journey by boat, choosing to be its sole passenger, for Rs 500. The boat was steered by two 13-year-olds, though they looked much younger, and as we glided on the Ganga in the most glorious moments of dusk, I saw something I had been wanting to see: a body floating in the river. At first I thought it was a buffalo, but as it bobbed closer to the boat, I could see the outline of a human head. To be doubly sure I asked the boys, “What’s that floating?”
One of them replied: “Laash hai, laash!” — It’s a body.
A rewarding day on the whole. While I was walking on the ghats, the most exhilarating moment was the discovery of the Pashupatinath Temple, built by the Nepalese some 200 years ago, on Lalita Ghat: totally empty, a perfect place to meditate, and it also gives you a commanding view of the river. Then I lingered for a while at Manikarnika Ghat, and then walked on before stopping at Panchganga Ghat, where I climbed up the steep steps to visit the shrine of Trailanga Swami, considered an incarnation of Lord Shiva.
At the shrine, an elderly man, who looked south Indian, was meditating in front of the life-size figure of Trailanga Swami, also depicted in the meditative pose. As a caretaker showed me around and told me about the life of Trailanga Swami, the man got up and came closer to listen.
“Will you please translate what he is saying,” the south Indian man requested me.
I told him whatever the caretaker had told me, and then asked him, “Where are you from?”
“Chennai,” he replied.
“Where do you live in Chennai?”
“Thiruvanmiyur. Why, are you familiar with Chennai?”
“Yes, sir. I work with The Hindu.”
“Wait a minute, are you —?” He mentioned my name.
“Yes, sir.”
“Well, we are already friends on Facebook!”
The long walk, in spite of the company of the river and of Shiva, had been quite a lonely one. Suddenly, I didn’t feel lonely anymore.
The two young boatmen dropped me at Shivala Ghat from where I climbed the steps and walked back to my hotel. My feet hurt but I was happy about the day being well spent, and that I had no deadline dangling over my head to keep me up all night. I wanted to have two drinks and go to sleep, so that I could wake up early and catch the sunrise.
But as soon as I flung myself on the bed and looked at my phone for notifications — as one instinctively does these days — I learned that Ravindra Jain, the music director, had passed away. The smugness evaporated and sadness crept in. I sent the room boy to get me half-bottle of whisky. Ravindra Jain, after all, defined my childhood: R.D. Burman came into my life much later.
Geeta Gaata Chal released when I was five or six, and after the watching the film in the theatre, with my parents, I would often try to imitate Sachin as shown in the title song — a happy-go-lucky youngster carrying nothing but a flute and a small bundle of clothes and singing away to glory. I wouldn’t have pretended to be Sachin had I not been attracted to the song, and if the song was appealing to even a six-year-old back then, imagine what Ravindra Jain’s music must have done to the grown-ups.
Needless to say, most of his songs were a hit those days, especially in the part of the country where I grew up. The singer might have been Yesudas, a Malayali, or Jaspal Singh, a Punjabi, but the rendition always made you smell the soil of the Gangetic plains, the heart of IndiaI
Since I am a Kishore Kumar fan, and since Kishore Kumar and Ravindra Jain shared a healthy rapport as long as both were alive, I would like to present five songs they created together — songs that went to become legends as well as songs that I personally cherish:
2.  Har haseen cheez ka main talabgar hoon, my most favourite Kishore solo; 
4. Na aaj thha; I could die for this song — beautiful!
5. Premi sabhi hote hain deewane — Oh, the way Kishore Kumar throws his voice into the microphone!
Very sad that Ravindra Jain earned only a Padma Shri. He should have got a Padma Vibhushan long, long ago — considering his music smelt of the soil of India.


जहाजी कउवा said...

That is exactly how a day shall be spent in Banaras. I am not sure whether Ghosh babu likes chaat or not, but I add a visit to Kashi Chaat bhandaar in Godauliya.

Anonymous said...

Cheers to the wanderer in you! You bring out gems - be it cities, their stories, or their music...

RunAnkh said...

You bring out the beauty of a place, so simply, so beautifully!

I am a Kishore Kumar fan!

Raj Gaurav Debnath said...

Nearly 84 ghats on foot - My Goodness!!! Anyways, nice choice of songs...